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V23K18 | Pasel.Kuenze | Architecture

Design for a private house in an urban master plan by MVRDV.


As the plot does not allow for traditional front or back gardens, the design incorporates open-air spaces within the build structure. The open floor plan with its voids generates exciting views inside the volume and enhances the relation between inside and outside spaces. As the wooden facade is vertically extended, the roof provides a hidden garden with a maximum of privacy.















Architects: Pasel.Kuenzel Architects
Location: Leiden, The Netherlands
Project Area: 130 sqm building + 60 sqm garden
Project year: 2005-2009
Photographer: Marcel van der Burg

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